• The British Museum (London, England)

    The British Museum – Coins and Medals click title to view Almost 600 medals were acquired by the British Museum in London, England from M. Frankenhuis over the years in 1919-1921, mostly the product of German artists. George Hill, the Keeper of the British Museum was keen on acquiring these significant medals for the British Museum Collection since it was not possible for them to obtain from the belligerent countries during the first World War 1914 – 1918. However, as a citizen of neutral Netherlands, M. Frankenhuis was able to procure these medals. Although aliens were barred from England in 1919, these medals were “deemed of value to the nation”…

  • The Kadman Museum (Tel Aviv, Israel)

    Museum and Exhibit Kadman Numismatic Pavillion click title to view The vast store of World War I numismatic material of the Frankenhuis Collection numbering 1600 medals, medalets, and plaques pertaining to World War I and 500 items of World War II was donated in 1961 to the Kadman Numismatic Pavillion of Eretz Israel Museum, in Tel Aviv, Israel. Three years later, a special exhibit entitled: “Five Years of Nazi Domination as Told by Commemorative Medals” was curated. Kadman Museum WWI Centennial Exhibit click title to view A permanent World War I Centennial exhibit of the Frankenhuis Collection medals of World War I was launched in 2016. Selections from the largest…

  • Columbia University Library (New York, U.S.A.)

    Rare Books and Manuscripts Library Frankenhuis Collection of World War I Posters 5,000 posters of World War I, amassed by Maurice Frankenhuis of the Frankenhuis Collection were donated in 1975 to Columbia University Rare Books and Manuscripts Library in New York. Columbia University Libraries Archival Collections World War I posters from a collection of almost 5.000 that survived two world wars, Nazi looting and 26 years in the basement of a West Side apartment house, have been put on display at Columbia University. A gift of the family of a concentration camp survivor, the collection gives Columbia a total of about 8,000 World War I posters, one of the largest…

  • The Jewish Museum (New York)

    Lodz Ghetto coins donated to Jewish Museum in New York, 1965 “Der Aelteste der Juden in Litzmannstadt” (The Oldest of the Jews in Litzmannstadt) During the World War 1939-1945 the words “concentration camp” became words of fear. Unlike prisoner-of-war camps and internment camps which gave at least some recognition of the rules of war, concentration camps were slave labor and death camps, with the emphasis on death. Other than political prisoners, the bulk of the concentration camp inmates was comprised of races that the rulers of Germany seemed determined to eradi- cate, with the Jews in first place. Six million died in these camps, the result of starvation, brutality, shooting…